Distributed Learning

Distributed learning: to provide choices and alternative approaches to learning where teachers as professional have knowledge and skills to decide which approach to adopt when and for what reasons (Pillay, 2002: 15).

Teachers have to provide repertoire of approaches and strategies. Just as there is no single solution to all problems, one teaching approach will not facilitate the development of all knowledge types (Pillay, 2002: 25).

Different students learn through different approaches (Pillay, 2002: 25).

Pillay (2002: 26) proposes a set of continua that represent the distributed learning models as follow:

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Teachers need to move back and forth within the continuum to facilitate students to achieve the maximum learning outcomes, dependent on the content, learning contexts, and students (Pillay, 2002: 25).

Learning reform is not only the student-centered approach (Pillay, 2002: 25-26).

To promote distributed learning, teachers need to be professions (Pillay, 2002: 26).

Educators (teachers) first need to clearly understand the various pedagogues before choosing the best approach for particular situations (Atagi, 2002: 3).

Distributed learning model argues the need for a repertoire of approaches and strategies. Just as there is no single solution to all problems, one teaching approach will not facilitate the development of all types of knowledge. The teachers and students need to be able to move back and forth on continuum between traditional and constructivist approaches to achieve the maximum learning outcomes, dependent on the content, the learning environment and the students (Atagi, 2002: 52).

Pillay (2002 cited by Fry, 2002: 4) urges careful consideration of distributed learning as a model to foster the use of diverse and multiple approaches to pedagogy, which should not be limited to only student-based learning.

A distributed learning model emphasizes multiple and diverse pedagogical strategies to encourage active, dynamic learning (Pillay, 2002 cited by Fry, 2002: 9). There is no simple, single formula for effective teaching (Sumon 2002b: 6 cited by Fry, 2002: 9). To do this, teachers must be empowered to enable them to develop their own creative teaching models appropriate for their context and situation (Fry, 2002: 9). Moreover, to implement this distributed learning model, the educational supervisory system must also be transformed so that supervisors support those already engage in distributed learning and to encourage and assist others in moving in this new direction (Fry, 2002: 9).

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